Japanese Swahili

Posted by James, 16 Feb 07

Well I have decided to be a little serious today and give you all some fatherly advice. Well Jesus used to use parables in the Holy Book. Lemme give this a shot. :-P

The Japanese are amazing people. They embrace other people's cultures so well its amazing. A friend of mine in Kenya, told me how those people speak grammatically correct Swahili language... their Swahili is much better that that of most Kenyans. It’s really amazing how they do it. One Japanese lady went to Kenya 3 years ago, got assimilated into one of the ethnic groups - Luo community - and even got herself a Luo name - Anyango nyar Siaya (Anyango of Siaya). Well the lady now lives with a family in Siaya district and plays Kenyan lyre called Nyatiti and really enjoying herself and singing in Luo language while at it.

nyatiti.jpg

Your perfect partner could be online right now...

What are you looking for?

Now imagine a Japanese woman playing the lyre above.

You may be asking yourself "where the f*** is James going with all this crap?" :roll: Lemme get to the point and save you the thinking trouble. The thing is the Japanese are not afraid to try out new things, exploring the unknown. We should do the same for multicultural relationships - get ourselves naked ;-) and dive into the cold water. Allow each party to bring a little part of their heritage and culture into the relationship. Acknowledge the fact that both of you are different but united. Am sure with that in mind, once you are in the water, you won’t want to get out.

Did my parable work? ;)

4 responses to "Japanese Swahili"

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  1.   TricciNicci says:
    Posted: 17 Oct 09

    Well Star, be encouraged. Not every person who explores a culture wants to 100% assimilate. Experiencing other cultures often means creating a higher appreciation and even understanding for your own. It belongs to the "When In Rome Do As The Romans Do" philosophy. Or better yet, Clinton's "I smoked but I didn't inhale" really applies well. I think originality must be strong when a person can experience and not have their head twisted in another direction. What is your culture? Are there things in it you would think to change? If so what and what would you replace those ideas with if you found they could use strengthening? When my sisters and I were growing up Asian cultures were a big part of our cultural influence due to my Dad often traveling there on business. To this day I have an adaptedness of Fung Sui, can eat precisely with Chop Sticks and enjoy certain of the Asian philosophies due to that exposure. Yet, I've never visited Asia! It also sounds as if you have quite a bit of direct exposure to the Asian culture. Is there something you could glean from them on their culture or share with those you have contact with? We are all humans and can all learn from one another. Heck, you could probably share cultural stuff with me and I bet I'd find a place of value for it. Namaste

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  2.   JohnLove says:
    Posted: 05 Jan 09

    Ooooops correct spelling{ language}

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  3.   JohnLove says:
    Posted: 05 Jan 09

    Different cutlures has always interested me.and leaarning about them.I have did some travel some across the water,learnt another langue,I lam also bilango ,but that was a few years ago but loved it.and to me the color of the skin is only a minor thing,the charateristic of any person is what's from the heart ,

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  4.   Star says:
    Posted: 27 Feb 07

    As much as I admire your enthusiasm, I believe your story to represent a small minority. I attend a school where there are many asian students (including japanese). I have found that their interest in other cultures to be at best superficial, only because it is something new to them. In the long run I have observed that many of those students who 'embrace' other cultures by engaging in activities not considered to be traditionally asian, or even dating other races, harken back to tradition in the end because of restrictions they perceive coming from family. While it is lovley to hear of a person truly embracing a culture, learning a language to me doesnt automatically mean appreciation (to me at least). Just my 2 cents, Star

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