What does this have to do with dating?

Posted by Leticia, 15 Apr 07

The Story of Shaquanda Cotton

And you thought the doll test was hard to watch...

One girl burns down a house, one shoves a teacher's aid. They were both 14 in a small Texas town and sat before the same Texas judge. One goes free, the other to jail. One was white and the other was black...the year 2006. But what does this have to do with dating?

Your perfect partner could be online right now...

What are you looking for?

But what does this have to do with dating? This was the question that I was asked when I said that I wanted to write about a young girl that was serving time in a Texas Youth detention facility for shoving a hall monitor at her high school. The 58 year old teacher's aid was not seriously hurt. However, she was white and Shaquanda Cotton black. Perhaps the biggest controversy in this case was not that the 14 year old black girl was sentenced to up to 7 years for shoving; but that the same judge that handed down this sentence, just a few months earlier had given another 14 year old girl (who happened to be white), probation for burning down a house. Shoving equals prison and Arson equates to probation. I'd heard that things in Texas were big, but I had no idea.

As you can imagine, once Shaquanda's story finally hit the press (almost a year after she began to serve her sentence), tempers were flaring and everyone was screaming racism. We heard every detail of the young girls defiant past. Let's see there was the multiple disciplinary issues that she received at the school after, her mother began complaining of unfair treatment too other minority children (at the time none were her own).

Coincidently, Shaquanda began to get write ups for (1) wearing a shirt that was an inch too short, (2) pouring too much paint into a cup during art class and (3) defacing a desk that later school officials reported showed no signs of damage.

During Shaquanda's trial, which by the way, (her mother was not allowed in the court room because she was told that she was a witness), school officials would testify that the 14-year old girl "demonstrated a pervasive and consistent anti-authority attitude". Wow, I think I know a few of those types. They are called TEENAGERS!

I guess that's what brings me to my point. What does this story have to do with dating? Nothing and everything. I'm sure I could find some cute and clever way to tie in the "race" card and how this poor little black girl is being treated so wrong. Or go for the angle of her single parent mom trying to raise a child and how we can learn to deal with hardships, trials and tribulations in our own relationships. But, no I'm not going to either of those places.

I'm going to that place that exists inside everyone on this "interracial" dating site, your heart. I feel the need to point out that in the year 2007; we have bigger problems and challenges in our society than getting poor service and nasty looks. It goes deeper than what a has-been comedic actor says or if we should sleep with our ex. It's important that in addition to getting all the feel good, self improvement and how to find the love of your life lessons, that we also get the information and knowledge of what social problems are going on in our world. It's important to know where you and your companion stand on these important issues.

It's imperative that we not only know about the "hot topics and issues", but that we also FEEL something. To know how we feel and how those whose opinions we respect feel. We can't allow ourselves to become numb, because in this day and age nothing surprises us anymore. We've ALL been there, done that, seen it, wrote it, lived it!

When we start to think that it's okay for a 14-year old child to be locked away for shoving while grown ass adults serve less time for drugs, rape and murder, we've got bigger problems than how to find the love of our life.

This story really has nothing to do with dating, but everything to do with understanding, compassion and love. And without those things what's the point of dating?

This is Leticia reminding you to not loose your heart; you may need it one day.

56 responses to "What does this have to do with dating?"

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  1. Posted: 10 Nov 08

    Leticia, This is a powerful article. For me, it DOES have something to do with dating. I do not date men that are not aware of the political climate. I have received prejudice in the form of being spit on or glared at for walking with my black date. (I'm white.) But I'm EXTREMELY aware that it is nothing compared to what black people STILL face, today. And my Native friends and Latino friends tell me stories of how they face racism and prejudice. It is pretty surreal and it is heartbreaking. I sincerely hope that Obama's presidency helps decrease racism in this country. I'm glad you chose this site to descuss judicial racism. Once again, if my "date" is ignorant about the world around him, I have no desire to date him. peace, stillahippie

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  2.   Pia65 says:
    Posted: 06 Sep 08

    This story is just more proof that racism is not a thing of the past... No wonder the "scales of justice" is wearing a blindfold...Its JUSTICE VS. JUST US!

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  3.   cutesaved1 says:
    Posted: 24 Jul 08

    When I first read this, being a native Texan, I had flashbacks of my youth and school days. I have white teachers referring to students of color as Spics, Specs, etc. I had one particular teacher who, when describing a peanut butter sandwhich (don't ask me why) explain that white children spread their PB thinly. She repeatedly called the only Mexican student in the class 'wetback'. Dumb I know. I was in the 4th grade, and my mother and father had recently separated. With all the things she was going thru I did not want to burden her with the ignorance of this situation. That's how I felt at the time anyway. But the same time, once I was a little older and now in a predominately Black school I experienced racism by my own people. I spoke proper English, had lighter skin than alot of the other students. Racism, no matter who is spewing it, is an ugly, ugly abomination! It's only when we speak up collectively, can we stop the beast! PLEASE READ: http://skepticalbrotha.wordpress.com/2007/04/01/shaquanda-cotton-released/ March 31, 2007 HOUSTON — Shaquanda Cotton, the black teenager in the small east Texas town of Paris whose prison sentence of up to 7 years for shoving a teacher’s aide sparked nationwide controversy, was released Saturday. Her release, ordered by a special conservator appointed to overhaul the state’s scandal-ridden juvenile prison system, was the first of what could be hundreds as a panel of civil rights leaders begins reviewing the sentences of every youth incarcerated by the Texas Youth Commission to weed out those being held arbitrarily. “We have no confidence in the system that was in place,” said Jim Hurley, spokesman for the conservator, Jay Kimbrough. “And this case is an example of what we expect to happen if something wrong has been done to youths being held inside that system.” Cotton, who is 15, had no prior criminal record when she was incarcerated a year ago under an indeterminate sentence that could have lasted until her 21st birthday. Her case rose to national prominence and became the focus of ongoing civil rights protests after a March 12 Tribune story detailed how a 14-year-old white girl convicted of the more serious crime of arson was sentenced to probation by the same judge. Cotton’s case occurred against a backdrop of persistent allegations of racial discrimination inside the Paris public schools — allegations that are the subject of a continuing probe by the U.S. Department of Education to determine whether black students in the district are disciplined more harshly than whites. “When I learned about this case, I thought, this just looks so bad and smells so bad it made me hurt,” said state Rep. Harold Dutton, the influential chairman of the Texas Legislature’s juvenile justice committee. “I told [prison officials] I wanted her out of there immediately.” The superintendent of the Ron Jackson State Juvenile Correctional Complex in Brownwood, Texas, where Shaquanda Cotton is being held, called the girl’s mother, Creola Cotton, Friday afternoon and told her she could come pick up the youth, Creola Cotton said. But because it is a five-hour drive from Paris to Brownwood, and the weather in the area on Friday was severe, Creola Cotton said she couldn’t reach the prison until Saturday morning. Later Friday, prison officials, who had not told Shaquanda of her impending release, allowed her to call her mother. ‘She nearly fell on the floor’ “She thought they were bringing her to the office to tell her I was not going to be able to visit this weekend like I was planning because of the bad weather, so she was already crying,” Creola Cotton said. “I said, ‘Oh, I’m still gonna come see you tomorrow. But you’re going to be coming home with me.’ She nearly fell on the floor.” Officials said Shaquanda Cotton was being released on 60 days’ probation to allow her to access state health and counseling services. But after that, she would be completely free, they said. Creola Cotton said her daughter would not return to the Paris public schools but would pursue her GED at home. What effect her release might have on the pending legal appeal of the youth’s case was unclear. Since she has been in prison, Shaquanda Cotton said that she had grown despondent surrounded by other youths who were hardened criminals, and that she had tried to commit suicide. Her sentence, which ultimately was up to the discretion of prison officials, had twice been extended, first because she would not admit her guilt as required by prison regulations and then because she was found with “contraband” in her cell — an extra pair of socks. Those sentence extensions drew the attention of Kimbrough, who was confirmed by the state Senate on Thursday as conservator of the youth prison system, which has been rocked by a sex scandal over allegations that guards and administrators coerced inmates for sex. Kimbrough, a former deputy attorney general, said last week that he was convening a special committee to examine the sentences of all 4,700 youths in Texas juvenile prisons to determine how many might have had their sentences unfairly extended by prison authorities — and that Shaquanda Cotton’s was the first case he intended to review. Prison officials said it was Kimbrough who personally ordered the girl’s release on Friday. Since the Tribune’s first account of Shaquanda Cotton’s case, her story has been circulated on more than 400 Internet blogs and featured in newspapers and radio and TV reports across the country. Two protests demanding her release were held in Paris and a third, to be led by Rev. Al Sharpton, was scheduled for Tuesday. Even before news of her impending release broke Friday, the Lamar County District Attorney’s office, which prosecuted her and pressed for her to be sent to prison for up to 7 years, made an abrupt turnaround and said the youth had served enough time and ought to be freed. Court discrepancy revealed “Let her out of TYC,” said Allan Hubbard, spokesman for Lamar County District Atty. Gary Young. “Hell, she’s done a year for pushing a teacher. That’s too long.” Hubbard also backed away from claims he and Young made this week in numerous media interviews that the judge in the case, Lamar County Judge Chuck Superville, had had no choice but to send the youth to prison because her mother had testified that she would not cooperate with probation officials had the judge sentenced the teen to probation. On Thursday, Young’s official Web site contained this assertion: “This juvenile’s mother (Creola Cotton) told the judge she would not comply with conditions of probation.” But a review of the full court transcript shows no such testimony. In fact, Creola Cotton repeatedly answered “yes” when asked in court whether she would comply with any conditions of probation that the judge might impose. On Friday morning, after an inquiry about this discrepancy by the Tribune, the district attorney’s Web site was altered to read: “Through her actions of non-cooperation, Ms. Cotton told the judge she would not comply with conditions of probation.” -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Possibly related posts: (automatically generated) Report says Calif. should end juvenile prisons Posted in Criminal Injustice System, Politics, Race, Racist Judges, Shaquanda Cotton, Texas Injustice, Texas Politics, racism

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  4.   fkoi says:
    Posted: 12 Apr 08

    In this case, is it "...the law is a ass--a idiot," as Charles Dickens' Mr. Bumble said, or was the idiocy from Shaquanda Cotton and/or her mom and/or legal team? According to testimony, Shaquanda Cotton did assault a public official, a 58-year old teacher's aide. She seems to be an angry and overly defiant teenager and if so, probably needs counseling more than time. She was sentenced to a "juvie" of which I have no knowledge but probably is way more punitive than therapeutic. What is the law in Texas? Is a conviction of assault on a public official by a juvenile a felony punishable by incarceration in a juvenile facility until the age of 21? If so, why didn't Shaquanda take the offered plea deal to reduce the sentence to a misdemeanor count with two years of supervised probation? Why didn't her mom insist? Did she not push the aide? Apparently she did. Was this racism? In spite of the ongoing and permeating presence of racism in America, not every incident involving a Black person is based in racism, even in Texas (or New York City where baseball bats and Black men come in contact all too often). Stupidity, legislative, judicial, parental and adolescent, seems to be to blame here, not racism. Oh yeah, she is out of the juvenile facility and back in school, so the system did work in this particular case, though not particularly well or without protest.

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  5.   mossimo36 says:
    Posted: 09 Apr 08

    Wasn't she let out? I thought she was, anyway

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  6.   Chilstroke says:
    Posted: 14 Jan 08

    Soory for the lateness of this comment but I sometimes miss things I should read. I see this as a continuation of the whole divide and control game. It's less about race than class and power. It's a white power structure but it has faces of many colors Cindi Rice is a black woman but sells she self to a system that mostly benefits a very few white people (I'm a white man but class is more important than race in our society). The problem is the system and the love of money and power that is the problem most white people do not have problems with black people and freely interact with them on a daily basis at least in California. I grew up in rural Minnesota and once was asked if there were many black people there I said there anit a whole lot of anybody there. Society is and has changed but there are changes that our ruling class will not accept and racism is a useful tool for them to keep the plebeian class squabbling among it's self. Divide and Conguer, Divide and rule among themselves they don't care what color your skin is as long as their interests are served.

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  7.   Jade74 says:
    Posted: 24 Aug 07

    A new case that is similar to this one is the Jena6 in La.

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  8.   Cocokisses says:
    Posted: 13 Aug 07

    Purdey, the family was doing all they could to get the workd out about Shaquanda. They called the major networks, wrote letters, sent a chain e-mail asking for support and to write to the Govenor of Texas. The good news is that they did get everyone's attention and Shaquanda is back in school. I was happy to provide the update because this was such an emotional story for all who read about it.

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  9.   Purdey says:
    Posted: 12 Aug 07

    After reading the comments of posters like Raymond and Jeff, one can understand how these injustices occur. There are posters here who will forever make excuses for racist attitudes. Maybe they mirror their own opinions. I wonder why it took so long for this incident to come to international attention. What were the family doing when these events were unfolding? Or maybe they were just too mortified to take action. It is possible for this to incident to occur in the UK, but it would not have resulted in a jail sentence. The black population is tiny, but it would have come to public attention immediately. Cocokisses, I agree with your comments on the 27th April, and thanks very much for the update on Shaquanda.

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  10.   Cocokisses says:
    Posted: 10 Aug 07

    All I can say about Texas is that while I agree with some of Bob's post, I happen to love San Antonio. I don't know what the rest of Texas is like. I do know that the first time I went there, I met some of the nicest people I have ever known. I go every year, and one day I hope to build a home and retire there. I will be the first to say that I don't like Bush, but I won't be afraid to visit the state just because this President is from there. I will tell Bob to visit sometime...he will be surprised at how nice the people are. I know I was!

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  11.   hrshykiss2 says:
    Posted: 05 Aug 07

    wait, wait , now we are blamming Bush for the actions of a stupid racist Judge and one cummnity, and a teacher. Are we gonna blame all of the whole of Texas for the actions of a few! Remember it was under George Bush, and the same State that two young white men were put to death for the brutal killing of a black man!! He could have pardoned them, or gave them life in prison as in the past, So let's not get carried away and blame the whole of Texas ok. I know some beautiful whites in Texas and they hated this story as much as blacks did, and were very vocal about it! Are we gonna blame the whole state of Michigan for that white woman who divided a whole town because she killed her kids and white people were easy to believe that a black car jacker took her kids and her car! Or any other state where there are cases like this and say don't go there. Well then blacks might as well lock their doors and sit at the window in every state in America with pistols ready, cause it happens all over America not just Texas and not only under George Bushes watch. Do we blame all other presidents for hate crimes and unfair judicial cases that happened under their watch, give me a break!

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  12.   hrshyskiss2 says:
    Posted: 05 Aug 07

    Twono, brillantly said, my man, if that happened American Justice would be a lot different in this country! I also believe that all white cops who work in all latino latino and black neighborhoods should live there! So they see the people they are suppose to protect as more than criminals and minuses to society! It's kinda hard to bash someones face in with a stick, when you have a personal connection with them.

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  13.   Jade74 says:
    Posted: 19 Jun 07

    So very true Fala and Cocokisses.Racism still exist and it is swept under the rug and no one wants to acknowledge it.

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  14.   cocokisses says:
    Posted: 18 Jun 07

    Very true Fala. That's most of the problem right there. No one wants to acknowledge that they might be a racist, or that it does exist.

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  15.   mossimo36 says:
    Posted: 17 Jun 07

    Glad to hear and thanks for the update Cocokisses. Heard it on the news recently.

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  16.   Fala says:
    Posted: 15 Jun 07

    It's not even a secret D - many people here just don't want to acknowledge that racism still exists here.

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  17.   unme23 says:
    Posted: 06 Jun 07

    very interesting to read.

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  18.   D says:
    Posted: 30 May 07

    It's pretty sad that this issue still exists in 2007! It's this countries 'dirty little secret' & it's the shame that will contribute to our downfall. In my opinion, it boils down to guilt, shame & fear. That's why it's very important to watch, listen & learn from other people. Trusting right from the start can be dangerous!

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  19.   Cocokisses says:
    Posted: 16 May 07

    UPDATE! For those of you who didn't know, because of the outcry from several people across the country, and due to media exposure, Shaquanda Cotton was released from Juvenile Prison on March 31, 2007. Most of the officials behind this injustice have either been FIRED or RESIGNED. This case was a travesty, and because of people like us, this child was released. Also, upon her release, she received cards and gifts from across America. You did not have to be Black to know that this was wrong, and this child now has a chance to become a productive member of society just like the rest of us. God Bless all those involved in making this WRONG A RIGHT!

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  20. Posted: 16 May 07

    yeah, it kinda doesnt make sense.

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  21.   Cocokisses says:
    Posted: 16 May 07

    I'm lost on that one too Nick...I don't see any previous comments...

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  22.   Fala says:
    Posted: 16 May 07

    This story provoked some of the strongest reactions yet here. Keep stirring the pot. It really makes people think and that can t be too bad.

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  23.   Nick says:
    Posted: 10 May 07

    Who was arousing anger and bad feelings? I'm lost on that previous comment???!!!

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  24. Posted: 09 May 07

    kids will learn and catch on.

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  25.   doris says:
    Posted: 09 May 07

    Oops! did i strike a nerve? Let me break it down. I refuse to give that much power to anyone who arouses anger, and bad feelings. To even hold something like this up as a topic of conversation without a cure or a solution is not compassionate. This society has made it appear that women of color were nothing, that is why the little black girl chose a white doll. Change the way society preceives women of color and things will change. Racism is a form o mental illness, and people who fan a flame just to get a reaction, is just as sick. So that is why i say i do not care as a women of color i know the truth. The white doll is no better than the black doll, there is only the incredible lie behind it. Some day the little black girl will understand who she is and the power of her own dynamics and look beyond the lie and say "I don't care"

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  26.   sexyfirefly says:
    Posted: 08 May 07

    This article tells what goes on in todays society. But what we need to do is realize people need togeather as a nation an show the people of todays age to be a more responsible adult.. An the rasicm needs to come to a end. For this is 2007 its happenin all around.

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  27.   Member says:
    Posted: 06 May 07

    I can't believe this still happens in America of 2007. The girl should have receive a suspension for few days not sentenced to prison. I believe in Karma(what goes around comes around)God will punish the white red neck judge who only see color, nothing else

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  28.   Tajae says:
    Posted: 06 May 07

    Im 41 yrs old single mom of three not single by choice but my husband was murdered and these is one of the fear that comes over me on these site of tryin to find someone.Its hard to know that the world that we all live in being eaten away with racial segregation, we make should all love each, 7 years I think is cold and heartless for a 14 yrs old for shoving a teacher and or any teacher, my daughter which is the oldest is 16yrs old and feel it and heart goes out to this mom. The Lord will take of you my child

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  29. Posted: 01 May 07

    i just still find it hard to believe, when its 2007.

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  30.   mossimo36 says:
    Posted: 29 Apr 07

    A very sad tale...its hard to believe this is 2007

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  31.   Mrbacnasty says:
    Posted: 28 Apr 07

    Well you know as I sat and read this story I found it very disturbing but then I listened to it and the way it was narrated and well spoken gave me a feeling of how this story and the compassion I felt in the way the words were spoken is encouraging enough to make me tell all that this is one story that they will no doubt get a message out of to pass on.

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  32.   Cocokisses says:
    Posted: 27 Apr 07

    To comment on Jeff's remarks...You are seriously tripping? Aren't most of the remarks we are speaking of made by the group you CLAIM is being picked on? I have an even bigger question...if you feel that way, why are you on an INTERRACIAL dating site? The point we are trying to make is that it is so sad and heartbreaking that a 14 yr old with her whole life ahead of her is being jailed for 7 years for shoving a teacher-who was not hurt. She was wrong for what she did, and should have been suspended or punished but 7 years in jail? Where is the fairness in that?

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  33.   texasbest says:
    Posted: 27 Apr 07

    Some things just don,t change

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  34.   Aiishalove says:
    Posted: 23 Apr 07

    I cant believe this is happening in the 21st century! It is heartbreaking.

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  35.   2UTE4U says:
    Posted: 23 Apr 07

    i think think this is really really unfortunate that things like this is so pervasive in this so caled "age of reasoning". But all I can say is that hopefully this article will generate enough dialogue among people and wil give them a chance to see what they 're made of . ,articles like these are touch points but if I can't speak openly w/ a white guy on topics such as this then I can't see myself dating them ...to be white means you are priveleged...aND THIS THE THE GAWD AWESOME TRUTH ...

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  36.   thunder says:
    Posted: 22 Apr 07

    first off i want to appogize that this still exists!! that we misjudge people all the time, that we look at the color of someone's skin, we don't look at the heart of a person, which is what GOD looks at!!! what the judge did was totally wrong, he saw black as wrong and white as right,and we say we as a nation as grown, this just shows we're still living in the past, it's only covered up more!! to the girl who went to prison, i pray she learns to forgive, without it she'll have a hard time trusting people again!!!!! and let the love of GOD through for all to see!!

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  37.   Jabali says:
    Posted: 22 Apr 07

    I am from Kenya so I doubt whether I will be able to understand why people should act in a racist manner. But to put in a child for 7 years for shoving a teacher...and this in the United States. I think for that reason I may have to disagree with Laeticia and say that this kind of story has everything to do with dating. If people in the 21st century, Judges included, then we need, as human beings, to confront the question as to where we each stand on such issues, inter-racial couples included.

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  38.   Ethel says:
    Posted: 22 Apr 07

    Thank you so much Leticia for emailing this story. I'm not from here (i'm Canadian), but I'm black. It literally tears my heart when I consistently see the injustices and racism still so blatant. I've encountered it in overt incidences on my entry into this country and other occasions here and in Canada. Yes, it does exist in Canada and unfortunately there is no Utopia. My heart goes out to this young child who was obviously sentenced on the basis of her race as the punishment definitely does not fit the crime. What is more disturbing to me is, why wasn't there more of an outcry? We like to pretend because we have blacks represented in elevated positions for public view such as, Oprah, Osma, black news anchor persons, commercials filled with blacks appealing to our pocket books and it gives you a false sense that everything is balanced, equal and basically okay. When you mention racism here, white people are just appalled that we are so vociferous on an ugliness that purportedly no longer exists. I also know of black people who prefer to pretend when it happens that it is something else. As if the experience is so painful that they cannot admit that they are being treated a certain way because of their skin. We MUST address this issue, because it is still very alive here and not only inflicted on adults, but our most precious gift of all...our children. It is hurtful that as a race we are still considered and treated as second class and sub human. I have a daughter and it makes me quiver to think that it could have been her, me, anyone who is of colour and that alone should have everyone here alarmed and concerned. It was very, very painful for me to read this story and profoundly upsetting. I can't imagine how that mother felt, or her poor child being singled out for a judicial lynching. No one wants to admit that it still exists, although it is right in our face. It is like a dirty family secret that no one wants to talk about or acknowledge. How sad! This malady that permeates our society, must stop. I believe that once we are able to admit that we definitely have a problem, we will be able to go forward to heal and mend society. However, if a good portion of our society, especially those in power, doesn't admit it exist then the sore will remain until it becomes infestered and spread. Again, I thank Leticia for bringing this story to our attention.

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  39.   kenyanito says:
    Posted: 21 Apr 07

    its called racism and also misuse of resources. How does that teacher feel, i guese more stupid than ever before.The mother should have lobbied people to stand up for her daughter.I'm disgusted.

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  40.   tarah says:
    Posted: 21 Apr 07

    It took me a while to to read this article...I'm still trying to get over the Don Imus statement...For the life of me, I can't understand why the American Black women (overall in comparative to any other women in the world) are considered the "bottom of the barrel" so to speak...**sigh** Thank God I had a father who taught me different! He refered to me and my mother as a rose, a jewel, and queens! Many need to know that and remember not to handle us roses so difiantly, because we will wither... I pray for this girl and many like her of any race being descriminated against... Oh and Bill, no one should have to move for peace. God made this earth for all of us, with no restrictions!

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  41.   Bill says:
    Posted: 20 Apr 07

    Just about every adult in this land knows this story all to well. It has been going on for almost 300 years. There are parts of this country where there is little racism compared to the South and the East. That is why my Old Man moved West 60 years ago. And why I think that people who live in places like Texas slow to learn. Move to the urban West. Do it for your children; do it for yourself. I live in Tacoma, WA. and have dated black women for many years. No one has given me grief but one time but one time and that was a black man on the edge of a gang banging area.

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  42.   Jeff says:
    Posted: 20 Apr 07

    The story is tragic not just for what happened to Shaquanda but also that a judge who seems so blatently racist is still sitting on the bench - justice is blind, my butt! Ah, but don't be fooled, my friends. There are many instances of blacks who are just as racist. Political correctness is the worst idea in society in many years. It's not okay to pick on blacks, gays, women, etc., but white males, republicans, and Christians are acceptable targets. Until EVERYBODY behaves with a civil tone towards everybody else the famous words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., that people "...be judged by the content of their character and not by the color of their skin." will ring hollow.

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  43.   john744 says:
    Posted: 20 Apr 07

    Stories like this break my heart. They make me feel like crying or sceaming. I've lived with them my whole life and they still make me sick. I've fought aganist them until I tried. I'm a 62 year old white male, who is unfortunately single by choice. I'm not dating because I'm ill and do not want to subject anyone to my troubles, but I've dated and married across "color lines" most of my life and I had to suffer for it; usually by familys on both sides.

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  44.   Cocokisses says:
    Posted: 19 Apr 07

    Sumasun, PREJUDICE happens EVERYWHERE! Don't think that there is not prejudice in the UK because it is. I know this because my neighbor's daughter is bi-racial. Her ENGLISH grandparents won't acknowledge her existance because her father is BLACK. The poor kid is the first grandchild on both sides, but the grandparents don't even send her a birthday card. Your country is not above this so it can and probably has happened there.

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  45.   Member says:
    Posted: 19 Apr 07

    i read this article and felt numb, this is so obviously wrong and injust.

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  46.   Avichayil says:
    Posted: 18 Apr 07

    2006... is that really a yard stick for civilized behavior? is the majority of the planet good? or suffering? Its one thing for people to be sad with such an injustice (not to mention the stories you don't hear) but another for you to do something about this. So, from the comfort of your computer desk.... what will YOU do about this...? I have a favorite saying.... " Whoever saves one life, saves the world entire..." .

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  47.   sumasun says:
    Posted: 18 Apr 07

    I read this & felt sad & disgusted at the same time......This would NEVER happen in the UK!

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  48.   raymond says:
    Posted: 18 Apr 07

    to me i feel that the one who push the teach aid should have gone to jail because it's agaist the law to put your hand on a teach or a teach aid.plus the color of ones skin really has don't to do with all they did was let that one go who knows what that person may do to the next teach aid.i really don't think that was fair for one to go to jail and let one go

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  49.   Cmur says:
    Posted: 18 Apr 07

    Yes, I agree. The young black girl that shoved a teacher's aid should have been disciplined in some other manner. Spending years in prison for such small potatoes is ludicrous. Where are the priorities here. A white girl burns down a house with a mere slap on the wrist and the black girl pays dearly for shoving a teacher's aid. The judge should be replaced for passing such a horrible sentence.

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  50.   Member says:
    Posted: 18 Apr 07

    I'm a white, professional guy, and I enjoy the company of black women. This story made me FURIOUS. First of all, as you said, she was a teenager - it's normal to be angry and rebellious as a teenager. Also, MANY "teachers" are stupid, ignorant, pompous, controlling psychos who should NOT BE NEAR CHILDREN - OR ANYBODY. I remember MANY who threatened, intimidated, and DAMAGED us, and who should have been fired, arrested, tried, convicted, and sentenced to LIFE IN PRISON at hard labor. MANY "teachers" are MONSTERS FROM HELL. For MILLIONS of kids, public schools and "teachers" HURT them, and DAMAGE MUCH OF THIR LIVES. The solution - SUE THEM. This girl, her family, friends, neighbors, and now people NATIONWIDE will NEVER forget her terrible experience with this evil "teacher" and "judge". In fact, it will probably spawn many anti-white events nationwide. Another thing - Texas is a redneck hell. Stupid, ignorant, destructive Bush is a prime example. We won't even drive through it, and we advise everybody to do the same.

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